Posts Tagged ‘value’

Which Contemporary Artist is Best to Buy and Most Likely to Increase in Value?

July 31, 2012

Considering buying a picture by a Contemporary artist and you want a far less expensive work than a Picasso, or an Andy Warholl, but let us admit you also want it to be a good investment. You really are hoping that your chosen artist might well be discovered big time and suddenly be worth many more times what you paid and preferably sooner than later! So what should you be looking for?

In times when currencies are at risk and the stock market fails to do well, the chances of success(by choosing the right artist) are far better than those with the Lottery!

By being careful about what you buy and in choosing the right artist, although there is always an element of risk, the chances of losing any value are minimal.

Whilst I am not making any claims to be any kind of expert, I have been a keen successful collector for many years of various art forms and antiques that have mostly increased greatly in value. I do hope that by sharing with you my instincts that these will prove to be of some help to you. Obviously, just in case the picture you end up choosing, doesn’t jump up tremendously in value, it is most important that you really like your choice, so that at least you will enjoy living with it.

Your choice of picture says something about you, so what sort of picture should you look for? Here are a couple of my suggestions of how to begin the selection process: –

  • Firstly look for something artistic that you find attractive and beautiful, preferably a picture you feel sure your friends will admire and comment on.
  • It is best to choose an inspiring picture, that makes a statement, or that has something fascinating about it.
  • Then do some research on the artist.

Be very wary of all the hype, art critics and so-called experts who claim to know everything. These days you can search on the Internet and no longer be restricted to the local Galleries, you can search and find art from all over the world without leaving home. This means you can view the pictures you like and avoid all the sales talk. But how should you consider your choice of artist, if you want to have the best chance of your artist becoming suddenly famous and priceless? To have any such chance of succeeding your artist: –

  • Needs to have developed a recognisable different style, or show exceptional original creativity.
  • Should have already created a reasonable number of works that demonstrate a consistent style and originality.
  • Should already have received some recognition, from having held several important one-man exhibitions and received already some worthwhile press, or write-ups.

In the past the artists that eventually become the most sought after, are those that created their own style, where they were the first to do something original, or different, and they made use of it consistently to best advantage. Some sadly, would also add choose someone old, rather than young, as so often artworks tend to be far more appreciated soon after the artist has died.

Of the painters, at the moment I am favouring Sir Bernard Fleetwood Walker R.A. because he has a style of his own that has not yet been fully appreciated. My personal view is Sir William Russell Flint R.A. painted wonderful watercolours and although they are already highly valued, I still think they will continue to increase in value.

I am not aware of any really great changes in painting that are sure of success. There are some who make use of spray paints and I have seen a few unusual textures where cement and sand have been used mixed with the paints. There are pictures created in three dimensions by layering cut out prints, stuck closely on top of each other, there are small boxed frames filled with carefully chosen objects as pictures, there are paintings embellished with Swarovski crystals, or small mirrors and other materials, also there have been mixed media pictures making use of all sorts of materials to form an image. But although different, I do not see many of these as ever being considered as great art works, it is really a matter of hunting for only the most exceptional examples, if any of these techniques appeal to you.

PHOTOGRAPHY
But the most dramatic and exciting changes have been with photography! Photography is now a valued art form, as are limited edition prints (providing the edition number is not too large – should be well under 50). So what is new?

Thanks to digital imaging there are now computer-generated pictures, such as ‘fractals’. But as the computer made them, rather than the artist, I doubt that they will ever be highly valued. With computer manipulation, mixed blended images that were never possible before, can now be created, these artists should be studied.

I have seen some graffiti light painting pictures that are rather different. The new computer HDR(high dynamic range) images that provide a much greater range of definition at different light intensity levels are also impressive and can be very atmospheric (far more so than ever before).

But what matters most is the end result; it is the picture that counts, the artistic vision is so much more important than the technique.

Having said that, certain photographic pictures could only be achieved because of the technique. As an example, there is a unique technique that involves photographing projected images that have been projected on to other objects. This has successfully been used to create some very interesting and quite different pictures.

I believe that if you follow my guidelines, you will find pictures worth buying that really could prove to be a great investment.

Good Luck with your hunt, hoping you enjoy the search and that you do find a winner.

The author has been a very keen Asian antique collector for many years helping to create ‘The Cohen Collection’ but he is also an artist.  For much more information with lots of photographs seehis limited editions of only 8 of each picture (up to 60” or 150cm longest side!) at: –
http://www.artist-john-cohen.net

You can also be kept informed on John N. Cohen’s ‘Painting with Light’ Facebook Fan page
http://en-gb.facebook.com/pages/Painting-With-Light/208903157734

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Buying Affordable Contemporary Art, But Which Artist is Most Likely to Increase in Value?

July 28, 2012

If you are looking to buy a picture by a Contemporary artist, but want a less expensive work than a Picasso, or an Andy Warholl, yet at the same time you hope your chosen artist might well be discovered big time and prove that you made a great investment.

Then what should you be looking for?

Whilst I am not making any claims to be any kind of expert, I have been a keen collector for many years of various art forms and antiques (that mostly have increased greatly in value) and so I hope that sharing my instincts will be of some help to you.  Obviously, just in case the picture you end up choosing doesn’t jump up in value, it is most important that you really like your choice, as you will be living with it.

In times when currencies are at risk and the stock market fails to do well, the chances of success (by choosing the right artist) are far better than those with the Lottery!

Your choice of picture says something about you, so what sort of picture should you look for?   Here are a couple of suggestions of how to begin the selection process: –

  • Look for something artistic that you find attractive and beautiful, preferably a picture you feel sure your friends will admire and comment on.
  • It is best to choose an inspiring picture, that makes a statement, or that has something fascinating about it.

I suggest you be very wary of all the hype, art critics and so-called experts who claim to know everything.  So how should you consider your choice of artist, if you want to have the best chance of your artist becoming suddenly famous and priceless?   To have any such chance of succeeding your artist: –

  • Needs to have developed a recognisable different style, or show exceptional original creativity.
  • Should have already created a reasonable number of works that demonstrate consistent originality.
  • Should already have received some recognition, from having held several important one-man exhibitions and received already some worthwhile press, or write-ups.

In the past the artists that eventually become the most sought after, are those that created their own style, where they were the first to do something original, or different, and they made use of it consistently to best advantage.

Of the painters, I am favouring Sir Bernard Fleetwood Walker R.A. because he has a style of his own that has not yet been fully appreciated.  My personal view is Sir William Russell Flint R.A. painted wonderful watercolours and although they are already highly valued, I still think they will continue to increase in value.

I am not aware of any really great changes in painting that are sure of success.   There are some who make use of spray paints and I have seen a few unusual textures where cement and sand have been used mixed with the paints.  There are pictures created in three dimensions by layering cut out prints, stuck closely on top of each other, there are small boxed frames filled with carefully chosen objects as pictures, there are paintings embellished with Swarovski crystals, or small mirrors and other materials, also there have been mixed media pictures making use of all sorts of materials to form an image.   But although different, I do not see many of these as ever being considered as great art works, it is really a matter of hunting for only the most exceptional examples, if any of these techniques appeal to you.

But the most dramatic and exciting changes have been with photography.  Photography is now a valued art form, as are limited edition prints (providing the edition number is not too large – should be well under 50). But what is new?

Thanks to digital imaging there are now computer-generated pictures, such as ‘fractals’.  But as the computer made them, rather than the artist, I doubt that they will ever be highly valued.  With computer manipulation, mixed blended images that were never possible before, can now be created.  These should be studied.

I have seen some graffiti light painting pictures that are rather different.  The new computer HDR (high dynamic range) images that provide a much greater range of definition at different light intensity levels are also impressive and can be very atmospheric.

But what matters most, is the end result, it is the picture that counts, far more than the technique!

Having said that, certain pictures could only be achieved because of the technique.  As an example, I would like to draw your attention to my own works John Neville Cohen (as I would prefer to sell my pictures, for good prices whilst I am still alive).  Many photographers have used the name ‘Painting with Light’ but the pictures I created by photographing projected images that have been projected on to other objects, are known more appropriately as ‘Painting with Light’.  Not yet fully appreciated, but this is one of the most interesting purely photographic techniques, that is unique.  I believe once seen you will agree that my pictures also meet all the criteria mentioned.

Good Luck with your hunt, hoping you find a winner.

The author has been a very keen Asian antique collector for many years helping to create ‘The Cohen Collection’ but he is also an artist.  For much more information with lots of photographs see his limited editions of only 8 of each picture (up to 60” or 150cm longest side!) at: – http://www.artist-john-cohen.net

You can also be kept informed on John N. Cohen’s ‘Painting with Light’ Facebook Fan page
http://en-gb.facebook.com/pages/Painting-With-Light/208903157734

Some of the Wealthiest Chinese are Now Investing in 18th Century Jade!

November 3, 2011

Jadeite and Nephrite (both referred to as jade) have been highly valued for thousands of years, especially by the Chinese.  But for so many years it has mostly been the Western world that took over this fascination of collecting antique jade carvings.  Here in Europe and the USA much has been published and there have been many dedicated collectors and antique jade experts that created and influenced the market values.

But recently the wealthy Chinese have become very interested in jade again, but so far they mainly regard jade as an investment commodity.  As most of the usual forms of investment, currencies and property have all proved so precarious, perhaps these successful millionaires are being very shrewd!  This is why prices have now changed beyond belief!

The European and American collectors have highly valued the craftsmanship of antique jade pieces, some 19th Century, but particularly from the 18th Century and earlier; much has been studied and published for the benefit of other collectors.

Apart from the quality of the carving and the period of the piece, when considering jade, there is another consideration that can add value, that being the colour of the stone.  Many people do not realise how many colours of jade there are.  Antique jade carvings can be found in white, mutton-fat, various shades of green, yellow and lilac, black, even in red, and these can be a factor in the price.  Also if there is a seal (so many wonderful pieces have no signature) but if the seal is genuine (many were inscribed later) then this too adds to the value.  So for a very long period these were the main criteria that influenced the price.

Gradually antique jade of quality, has become more and more valuable.  This caused the Chinese to cash in by making lots of new copies of earlier jade pieces and they carved various others in less valuable stones, but called them jade too! So many have flooded the market.  They have also discovered ways of adding colour to jade.  However, very few collectors found any difficulty in recognising these, as nothing more than the cheap fakes, or modern copies that they are.  To be sure that the colour has not been added requires strong magnification, so it is not that easy to check.  I believe that over time the dyed stones revert back to the original colour, so to pay extra for bright lavender, yellow or green jade could prove most painful!

Subsequently some of these modern fakes are so much better (the carving has improved) and there are now a number of more difficult to identify fakes.  So there has become another important factor that affects the value and this is the question of ‘Provenance’.  Every jade is now regarded with suspicion, unless it can be established as having been in a well known collection, or auction that dates back to the time when these fakes were easy to spot, or better still, to an even earlier period.

So this has been the way of things, for quite a number of years, whilst I was collecting.  But now values are changing dramatically in a way that is hard for the collectors like myself to understand!  These Chinese investors are buying back their heritage, but more as an investment than as collectors.  They have decided that 18th Century pieces of a pure colour with no flaws and certainly not mottled are their preference, they particularly prize pure bright white jade, or pure green, as well as the bright emerald green that is often used in jewellery.  Also any of these jade carvings that happen to have a good seal mark (even if this seal is not genuine) now command a much higher value.

Talking of a much higher value, this is where the older collectors are now really confounded.  Because if we consider a well carved, good quality pure white 18th century jade carving, that would normally have sold for our expected highest value, in any auction these days, this same piece will probably sell for anything from 4 to 8 times that figure, to a Chinese investor!  But a similar in quality piece, that includes a flaw in the stone (often these were brilliantly carved making clever use of any flaws) and valued just as highly by past collectors, or a similarly valued piece, but in a mottled colour, today will certainly not appeal to these Chinese investors and so will not sell for such a huge sum, making our sense of values hard for us to reconcile.

The hope is that in time the Chinese will recognise the same values, as us older collectors, also that they will become collectors rather than investors, but who knows?

The author has been a very keen collector for many years in helping to create ‘The Cohen collection’.
http://www.jncohen.com/

Facebook Fan Page for John-Neville-Cohen


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